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Posts Tagged ‘Oracle’

Acquisition fever has set in and they’re dropping like flies, independent HIE vendors that is. Earlier today, Siemens announced its intent to acquire enterprise HIE vendor MobileMD. So in little over a year we have seen IBM snag Initiate, Axolotl fall into the hands of Ingenix/United Health Group (Ingenix is now known as OptumInsight), Medicity tie the knot with Aetna, Harris pick-up Dept of Defense clinician portal darling Carefx and Wellogic, a damsel in distress, being rescued by Alere. Elsevier also announce an intent to acquire dbMotion for a whooping $310M, but nothing came of that other than a substantiation of the rumor that dbMotion was being shopped.

That does not leave many small, independent HIE vendors that have some traction left in the market. Following is our list of such vendors and what might become of them:

4medica: A relative new comer to the HIE market, 4medica will be profiled for the first time in the upcoming HIE Market Trends Report which is scheduled for release in early 2012. 4medica is quite strong on lab information exchange. Future: 4medica still remains under the radar screen as it completes its platform to truly serve all HIE needs. Once that process is complete, the company is likely to gain increasing attention and will be acquired in 18-14 months.

Care Evolution: Privately owned and self-funded, founder has every intent to stay independent. As he has told us on more than one occasion, I’ve already made plenty of money and this is not about cashing out to the highest bidder. Future: Everyone has a price but this company may be one of the last to fall into the arms of another.

Certified Data Systems: Appliance (think small router with embedded HIE functionality) HIE vendor that has close, yet non-exclusive partnership with Cerner. Would not be surprised if they struck a similar deal with Epic as Epic struggles to connect to EHRs outside its system. Future: Fairly new to the HIE market but gaining traction. Will stay independent for next 12-18 months, after that, anyone’s guess.

dbMotion: One company already made a bid, but pulled back, thus pretty clear this company will be acquired, question is how much and we suspect it will be significantly less than what Elsevier was planning to pay. Future: If price is right, could be acquired at anytime.

HealthUnity: Small HIE vendor from the Pacific Northwest that made a big splash when with Microsoft (Amalga UIS) they won the big Chicago HIE contract. Future: With Microsoft cozying up close to Orion, HealthUnity will be looking hard for other partners and/or to be acquired. Will give them 12-18 months as an independent.

ICA: Another small HIE vendor that has had a few wins here and there but will come under increasing pressure from larger, better funded HIEs. Future: Likely to be acquired in next 6-12 months, maybe even earlier.

ICW: InterComponent Ware is a German HIT company and a sizable one at that with over 600 employees. To date, ICW has a very small presence in the US HIE market so an acquisition, if there were one, would have little impact.  Future: Their foreign ownership, size and interests in several health related markets make them an unlikely candidate for acquisition.

InterSystems: Arms dealer to all, InterSystems Cache and Ensemble are widely used in the market and the company has built upon these core technologies to get into HIE market. Future: Fiercely independent and senior team is basically the same since founding this company will remain independent.

Kryptiq: Having signed a strong partnership deal with Surescripts, Kryptiq is unlikely to be interested in any acquisitions talks. Future: Will remain independent for time being and if Surescripts’ Clinical Interoperability solution gains significant traction, Surescripts will likely acquire Kryptiq outright.

Orion Health: New Zealand-based, privately owned with good prospects in markets beyond America’s shores, this company will likely want to stay independent (future IPO) unless of course a very large software company (think IBM, Microsoft, Oracle etc.) gives them an offer they can’t refuse. Future: Will stay independent.

Getting back to the Siemens/MobileMD deal…

While we have not had an opportunity to talk with either Siemens or MobileMD (will provide follow-on update once we do) here are some quick take-aways:

Siemens has chosen to buy. This is unlike other EHR vendors who have either built their own HIE solution (athenahealth, eClinicalWorks, Epic, NextGen) or have partnered with others (Allscripts, Cerner, GE).

Existing partner doesn’t cut it. Siemens has an existing partnership with NextGen for ambulatory but NextGen’s HIE is a closed system. This prevented Siemens from being able to leverage this partnership to serve their client needs, which most often includes a multitude of EHRs in the ambulatory sector to interface with.

Lacked sufficient internal resources. By buying into the market, Siemens has signalled that it does not have the development resources to respond quickly enough to customer demand (not too surprising, Siemens has been struggling in the North American market for sometime). This also signals that they could not find the right partner outside of their NextGen relationship, which is a tad puzzling as we are quite sure they paid a premium for MobileMD.

Paid a premium. We estimated MobileMD sales in 2010 just shy of $8M in our 2011 HIE Market Report. HIE vendors are selling at a premium, even second tier ones such as MobileMD. Assuming industry average growth in 2011 (we peg it at 30%) that would give MobileMD sales of ~$10.5M for 2011. We put the final strike price for MobileMD at $95-110M.

Existing MobileMD customers relived. Unlike the acquisitions of Axolotl and Medicity, which both fell into the hands of payers, MobileMD is going to a fellow HIT vendor which must assuage the fears of more than a few MobileMD customers and prospects. Siemens intends to keep MobileMD whole, bringing on-board MobileMD’s president and founder, again contributing to continuity.

ADDENDUM: Please excuse our lack of posting on industry trends in a more frequent manner. Like many in the healthcare sector, Chilmark Research is struggling to keep up with demand and recruit top-notch resources. We seem to have hit our stride in this market, are receiving countless engagement inquiries and engaging in most of them. All good problems to have, but you dear reader are the one who ultimately suffers from our lack of posts. Thank you for your patience to date and know that we are doing our best to keep you informed with some of the best research and analysis of this critically important and meaningful market.

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Last week was the massive Salesforce.com user conference Dreamforce (massive in that there were more attendees at Dreamforce then this year’s HIMSS!). We’ve been reviewing more than a few articles and writings written by those who attended the event. In the few short years of its existence (~13yrs) Salesforce.com has become one of the leading Customer Relationship Management (CRM) vendors in the market and basically pushed the previous leader Siebel to the brink and into the arms of Oracle. Salesforce is arguably the leader in the Software as a Service (SaaS) market and thus someone to pay close attention to on all things “Cloud Computing.”

So what makes Salesforce.com so compelling and what are some parallels to the healthcare sector?

Similar Market Demographics: From the beginning Salesforce has always been structured as a SaaS and targeted the hard to reach and highly distributed sales forces of companies of all sizes. Actually, they first targeted the small to medium business (SMB) market and once successful there, went after Siebel in big enterprises. In healthcare, the vast majority of care is provided by small, 1-3 physician practices that are highly distributed across the country – perfect target for a hosted SaaS offering.

Deliver Value, Not Pain: Since most sales people get a large portion of their salary via commissions, the last thing they want to do is hassle with software that is cumbersome to use. Salesforce.com’s user interface (UI) is very intuitive and surprisingly customizable (within limits) for an SaaS offering. This allows a sales person to configure the the solution to their specific needs. We hear time and again from physicians that the EHR they are being forced to use doesn’t fit their workflow and is often painful to use. (Having been demo’d more than our fair share of EHR solutions, it still shocks us just how awful the UI is for these solutions.) Like their sales brethren, physicians need solutions that fit their processes and do not slow them down.

Fold in Rich Communication Tools: At this year’s Dreamforce, Salesforce.com CEO Marc Beniof spend a substantial amount of time focusing on the rich communication tools that Salesforce is embedding to tap the move to social networks. Right now, the US Government is dumping over a half billion dollars to stand-up HIEs in every State and enterprises are easily spending double that amount to facilitate information exchange in support of referrals, lab distribution, orders, etc. What if a Salesforce for healthcare arrived on the scene allowing physicians to securely exchange information in the same manner that those on Salesforce.com use that platform for secure ad hoc communication with internal and external partners to meet customer needs?

Provide Robust Security – No Leakage: Sales leads are a sales person’s bread and butter and they guard them with their lives for it truly is their livelihood. Thus, Salesforce had to build a system that ensured a sales person’s leads were their own with no possibility of a breach (leakage) to a competitor. If Salesforce can meet this strict requirement, is it such a stretch to preserve the integrity of personal health information (PHI) on such a system?

Focus on the Data & Deliver Simple Yet Useful Analytics: Sales is often a numbers game. This requires superior, robust data management and ultimately the ability to create a wide variety of pre-configured and customizable reports. As we move towards value-based contracts, providers of all sizes will be asked to provide reports as well (typically on quality metrics) to those paying the bills (CMS, payers, etc.).

Provide an Ecosystem: Salesforce has a vision to provide an ecosystem of third party apps on top of their platform but to date, like most companies, they have struggled to make much headway here. But in time, as more and more IT functions move to the “Cloud” to support an increasingly mobile device centric world, an ecosystem is inevitable. In healthcare, where one might successfully argue that physicians are one of the most mobile of professions, accessing apps via mobile devices is quickly becoming standard practice. Increasingly, the healthcare market and in particularly those far-flung physician practices, will look to ecosystems of apps delivered over the Web to their mobile device (touch-screen tablet) to support their practices.

Adhere to KISS Principle: Like sales professionals and for that matter just about any other professional worth their salt, physicians in private practices are extremely busy and the last thing they need is to fuss around with software maintenance and upgrades. Subscribing to a SaaS takes that big upgrade headache and slams it with a double dose of Excedrin.

This got us to thinking…

Who in the Healthcare IT (HIT) market might become the Salesforce.com of HIT?

EHR Vendors:
We can’t think of a single vendor in the EHR market that has the foresight, the vision, the chutzpa to pull off a Salesforce.com move. Sure, one can point to PracticeFusion (who happens to have received backing from Salesforce) but we don’t see the vision there. What about athenahealth you might ask? Yes, they like to portray themselves as such, but honestly, their bread n’butter solution is not a SaaS play but more of a straight services play delivered via the Internet and a lot of old school back office processing in a warehouse in Maine. All the other EHR vendors? Either they’re too small to matter or chained to their legacy business models that they can not break free of to deliver the scale and gravitas of a Salesforce.com like solution for healthcare.

HIE Vendors:
Increasingly, HIE vendors are providing simple EHRs targeting ambulatory practices, they certainly have the information exchange piece covered (to highly varying degrees) are beginning to fold in analytics (big reason why UHG acquired Axolotl) and some are looking to provide an ecosystem play such as Medicity with its iNexx platform, Covisint with its AppCloud or even Microsoft’s somewhat aborted attempt with Amalga. Yet, despite these efforts, we do not see any one HIE company really grasping the reigns and running away with the prize. Each of the aforementioned vendors have their own reasons why they haven’t quite captured the imagination of the healthcare sector and we are not holding our breath waiting for someone to breakout.

Others:
Emdeon has a huge presence in the market as a clearinghouse for claims processing and having just been taken private by private equity firm Blackstone, they may try to make such a play. At the most recent HIMSS sat down with Emdeon for a briefing where they hinted to a desire to move more directly into clinicals, but to date, we’ve seen nothing materialize and it is unlikely to happen anytime soon. Emdeon also has the very real issue of their existing business model (did you no their number one capital expense is postage stamps?) that will keep them on the sidelines.

NaviNet is similar to Emdeon in that they already have a direct connection into the physician’s office with some one million plus healthcare providers using their service. NaviNet has the links but it does not appear that they want to get into the nitty gritty of providing a host of other services and offerings on top of their existing platform. It appears that NaviNet will add small incremental services to their platform rather than go for the whole enchilada keeping the platform simple and streamlined.

Surescripts is making a play in the HIE market with its Kryptiq partnership offering the Clinical Interoperability platform. While still early in its development. the Surescripts play is the closest thing we have seen to date to match the existing Salesforce juggernaut and the one to watch.

Now we certainly do not claim to have all the answers, never have. That is why we have a comments section below. So dear readers, we’ve given you are analysis and now it’ your turn. Who do you think is in the best position to become the Salesforce.com of the HIT market?

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This morning, IBM announced that it will acquire leading healthcare Master Data Management (MDM) vendor, Initiate for an undisclosed sum.  The healthcare IT (HIT) sector is white hot right now so it is likely IBM paid a pretty penny for Initiate, the clear healthcare market leader in Master Patient Index (MPI) technology.  Combining Initiate sales for 2009 at around $90-95M, a hot sector (say 3.5-4x revenue evaluation)  and one concludes that IBM put down nearly $400M for this healthcare darling.  This acquisition confirms one of our 2010 predictions – a significant increase in HIT acquisitions, including the entry (or increased presence, as in this case) of large IT vendors.

So What Did IBM Get?

With tens of billions of ARRA stimulus funding being poured into the healthcare sector under the HITECH Act, IBM has picked up one of the real jewels in the industry who is ideally positioned to capitalize on a significant portion of that federal largess.

As we have written previously, core to HITECH legislation is that funding be used to promote “information exchange for care coordination.” Such coordination of care hinges on a clinician’s ability to pull up the right records, for the right patient, at the right time. Tapping such patient information tucked within an EHR, an HIE, a public health database, etc. at the click of a mouse is done via MPI, but this is no trivial task. Most software vendors offer an MPI solution within their product based on deterministic algorithms.  But these algorithms, that rely on such things as name, address, maybe a social security number, are often not robust enough for large data sets.  More advanced, albeit more complex, MPI solutions rely on probabilistic algorithms, which is Initiate’s core competency.

Initiate currently serves some 2,400 healthcare facilities and lays claim to being used at 40 or so health information exchanges (HIEs).  Currently, Chilmark Research is conducting a study on the HIE market (hope to have draft ready by HIMSS) and in our discussions with many in this sector, Initiate is seen as the clear market leader and partner to provide HIE clients with an MPI that will meet their complex information sharing needs.

In somewhat of a surprising move, Initiate jumped directly into the HIE market by acquiring the small HIE start-up, Accenx in October 2009.  It will be of some interest to see how aggressively IBM leverages both Initiate and the Accenx solution going forward.  Our bet is that IBM will partner for RHIOs (e.g. Axolotl, Carefx, Medicity, etc.) but go directly after the private HIEs within large Integrated Delivery Networks (IDNs) competing against the likes of large EMR companies Cerner and Epic as well as HIE pure plays Medicity, RelayHealth, etc.

Final Assessment:

Excellent move by IBM and an acquisition that they will be able to leverage in other markets such as their significant presence in supply chain management.

Installing Initiate requires a significant amount of services, IBM will be able to capitalize upon this as well.  Also, IBM has a not so insignificant hardware (large database servers) and software businesses  that can be combined with Initiate to provide healthcare with a larger, more complete solutions suite.

This acquisition will put increasing pressure on Oracle to make a bigger move in the healthcare sector.  (Note that Sun Microsystems, a recent Oracle acquisition, does have an MPI – being used in NHIN’s CONNECT platform – but reports from the field do not rate this solution highly).

Acquisition also puts some pressure on Microsoft’s Health Solutions Group, who yesterday closed on their acquisition of Sentillion.  Microsoft is making a modest play in the HIE market with Amalga UIS, Sentillion will also play a role here, but there is, at least to our knowledge, no MPI solution within Microsoft’s portfolio that can compete with Initiate. How Microsoft responds will be interesting to follow.

There is some danger, however, that Initiate may languish under the IBM umbrella becoming buried within a multitude of applications that IBM currently offers.  Hopefully, IBM recognizes the jewel they have acquired and will not let this market darling succumb to internal forces that may wish to simply drop Initiate into the large IBM application hopper.

For another perspective, Ray Wang of Software Insiders has a good analysis of this acquisition in the context of the MDM market space.

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top-ten-goldOne of the nice things about all the writing done over the past year is that one can go back, apply some analytics and see exactly what topics/posts were popular over the past year.

So, drumroll please…

Following are the Top Ten Posts at Chilmark Research for 2008 with brief commentary:

10) Zagat Physician Rating Goes LiveThere are now a plethora of physician rating services with this being but one example.  Unfortunately, this service is restricted to Wellpoint members.  Based on what we’ve seen from most payers in their seeming inability to truly engage consumers/members, doubt this Zagats service is getting much traction.

9) Wal-Mart EMR Mandate Implications: Wal-Mart is a massive presence in any of the markets it enters.  Their decision to chose a single EMR solution for all of their retail clinics reverberated throughout the market.  Now that Wal-Mart is rolling out the Personal Health Platform Dossia among its employees, one can expect eClinicalWorks to be closely tied to Dossia as well.

8 ) Oracle+Cerner=Opportunity: Rumors come, rumors go and some seem to take on a life of their own, resurfacing on a firly regular basis.  The rumor that Oracle will acquire Cerner does have some logic to it, but with the current financial mess, this won’t happen anytime soon.

7) Defining a Functional Model for PHRs or How Many Cooks Does it Take: This post took a critical look at the three functional models: one by HL7, another from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Project Health Design and the third from the payer organization AHIP.  We’re not too keen on any of these models as it is the market that will define a functional model that delivers value, not academics which predominate the first two groups or one from the payers, which have selfish self-interests at heart.

6) Google Health Goes Live: Post went up the day that Google formally released Google Health to the market.  A belated launch, some eight months after Microsoft released a pre-mature HealthVault.  Google Health will slightly more mature than HealthVault coming out of the gates, as seemingly stalled. See post in the Number 5 spot.

5) HealthVault Surges, Google Health Flounders: After all the anticipation for Google Health and the pending battle royale for mind-share between Microsoft and Google for the hearts and minds of health concious consumers, the battle is turning out to be boring. Google is following its common laissez faire approach to developing its service (very thin on resources being deployed) while Microsoft is investing significantly, and it shows.

4) Mobile Health on the iPhone: Since the launch of the 3G iPhone earlier this year we have seen an incredible number of health & wellness apps showing up on the AppStore, which number well over 400 today.  Recently, Apple redesigned the site to make it easier to see which apps are most popular.  Loads of opportunity remains for those that are creative as most apps are pretty simplistic.

3) eClinicalWorks Tight-lipped on the Wal-Mart Deal: This post followed on the heels of Number 9 above.  eClinicalWorks is one of the EMR darlings for smaller practices which remains a relatively untapped market.

2) Walgreen’s Ups Ante in Retail Health: In March, Walgreen’s made the dual move of acquiring both I-trax and Whole Health Management, two providers of corporate campus health clinics.  What seemed like a good move then, may now be one that they are regretting as employers continue to downsize and trim costs.  If Walgreens would have waited (and they could get the $$$ in this tight credit market) they would have been able to pick up these companies for a song today. Alas, hindsight is always 20-20.

and the Top Post in 2008 was…

1) Google’s Schmidt Outlines Health Platform: We all knew Google was going to release some form of PHR in 2008.  We even saw some early screenshots back in August of 2007 when a few presentation slides slipped into the public domain.  But after those slides, we heard nothing, saw nothing, but knew it was coming.  Thus, when Google’s CEO, Eric Schmidt took the stage as a keynote speaker at HIMSS, we waited in anticipation and Schmidt did not disappoint.

And that dear readers is what YOU, found most interesting at Chilmark Research, that is if we not include the post where we announced te release of our iPHR Market Report Executive Summary.  We were absolutely thrilled with how popular that post was (it far exceeded the number 1 post on Google above) and even more thrilled at all the people who have downloaded this Ex. Summary (nearly 400 downloads for all corners of the globe, at least all continents, withthe exception of Antactica, we’re still waiting for that one to come in.

Thank you all for visiting, reading and commenting. We value your input and hope in return, we have provided some valuable analysis on the market.

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In case you didn’t see it, Bloomberg had an article last week that assessed the possibility of the ever acquisitive Oracle (some 40 acquisitions in last 4+ years) making a move on healthcare by acquiring Cerner.

While I normally focus on consumer-facing apps, can’t help but comment on this story as I know Oracle quite well (and many of the companies it acquired) from my days as an IT analyst leading the Enterprise Group for the manufacturing centric analyst firm, ARC Advisory Group.

So is this possible/probable?

Well, yes and no for the following reasons:

Yes

  • Oracle is very savvy at making acquisitions work, no one does it better in the enterprise software market than Oracle.
  • Oracle, unlike major competitor SAP likes making acquisitions, its core to their growth strategy.
  • They need new markets to achieve target growth projections as their existing markets, while still having opportunities, are mostly at the mid-tier and lower levels and will not be enough.
  • Healthcare sector is increasing spending on IT, faster than most other large market sectors.  It is also a very large market.
  • They have existing presence in healthcare as most large healthcare enterprises are already running on top of Oracle databases.

No

  • Healthcare is a difficult, fragmented market with few large entities (target customers) among providers.  There are no GMs or Fords or Dow Chemicals to conquer, therefore cost of sales will likely be high.
  • Healthcare is full of regulatory requirements and lots of customization of software.  Oracle is not a fan of customized solutions and for years has aggressively promoted an out of box solution approach.
  • This sector has not seen much consolidation – there are far too many EMR solutions today.  Maybe a big play by Oracle will help to rationalize the market, but right now it appears too early for them, unless of course they acquire a couple of leading players serving different tiers of the market e.g., buy both Cerner and athenahealth.
  • This market has yet to demonstrate that it is truly a global market, which limits growth to North America for the time being.  Granted, that is still a big market, but its not like manufacturing where distributed product development and manufacturing has occurred for years and systems, process and software has been developed to support such activities.

Opinion:

Oracle will make a play in the healthcare market as it is one of the few markets remaining that does not have a large, true enterprise software vendor of the likes of Oracle or SAP (Note: SAP has seen some success in the native German healthcare sector but little here).  A company like Cerner is an obvious choice, but to be successful, they’ll need to make more than one acquisition to develop a significant presence.  Oracle may also come at it from the health plan side, though Trizetto, the dominant player here was recently acquired and unlikely to be available, unless of course Oracle pays a princely sum.

Oracle will make a play, but it won’t just be Cerner, or similar large EMR vendor, it will be several.

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